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Hong Kong East - Released 01/06/2019 at 04:42 #118585
headshot119
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Hong Kong East has just been released, shortly after the multiplayer game of the simulation began at the SimSig meet in Tokyo!

The simulation has four workstations, and includes full ARS.

Given that this is the first simulation based in Hong Kong, we strongly recommend a read of the manual, before you play.

This simulation is part of our donation-ware range, and is available via the "Check For Updates" area of the loader.

Dedication
In memory of Max Anderson, who annoyed us a lot but made us think, and who I promised this sim would be free.

"CHECK Do you stop at Capenhurst?" - Opinions are my own and not those of my employer
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Hong Kong East - Released 01/06/2019 at 07:30 #118589
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Thank you everyone who made this possible.
Liberate Hong Kong, the revolution of our times
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Hong Kong East - Released 01/06/2019 at 08:49 #118595
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Fantastic!

A big thank you and well done all those who were involved in the production of this sim.

Brings back wonderful memories as I travelled up part of this line to visit one or two places of interest including the railway museum at Tai Po Market.

I have attached some photos taken on that day.
The first is at one of the stations. Note the markings on the platform which show where passengers are supposed to board or disembark. This is supposed to speed up the station stops. Can't believe that there are so few people around, although it is mid-morning on a Monday. In the rush hour you wouldn't be able to move!
The second is a map of the MTR railway system. The East Line is shown in light blue and travels up towards the New Territories
The third shows the contrast between the old and the new railway stations at Tai Po. The old platform and station building (now part of the railway museum) on the right and the light blue platform canopy of the new station to the left.

We travelled on the MTR systems quite a lot as it's very cheap for pensioners. You can buy a special 'Octopus' card (similar to the Oyster card in London), which allows you to travel any distance (as long as you don't pass through any barriers) for 2 Hong Kong Dollars. That was about 20 pence!






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Your life can have a thousand different meanings or maybe just one....I'd recommend more than one in case you got it wrong - (Rezende)
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Hong Kong East - Released 01/06/2019 at 10:40 #118597
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Donationware payment made in thanks
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Hong Kong East - Released 01/06/2019 at 11:52 #118604
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The third shows the contrast between the old and the new railway stations at Tai Po. The old platform and station building (now part of the railway museum) on the right and the light blue platform canopy of the new station to the left.


[/quote]


Actually, the light blue construction is not a station canopy. It’s possibly just a boundary fence type of thing.
The railway museum is along side the track between Tai Po Market station and Tai Wo station. (see screenshot)


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Your life can have a thousand different meanings or maybe just one....I'd recommend more than one in case you got it wrong - (Rezende)
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Hong Kong East - Released 01/06/2019 at 12:25 #118605
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bugsy in post 118604 said:
The third shows the contrast between the old and the new railway stations at Tai Po. The old platform and station building (now part of the railway museum) on the right and the light blue platform canopy of the new station to the left.



Actually, the light blue construction is not a station canopy. It’s possibly just a boundary fence type of thing.
The railway museum is along side the track between Tai Po Market station and Tai Wo station. (see screenshot)

[/quote]

Those are relatively modern noise barriers.

Liberate Hong Kong, the revolution of our times
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Hong Kong East - Released 01/06/2019 at 15:49 #118611
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My thanks to my sources and beta testers, without which this wouldn't have happened.

As it is, it took far too long for reasons within my control.

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Hong Kong East - Released 01/06/2019 at 18:16 #118619
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geswedey in post 118597 said:
Donationware payment made in thanks

I've just done the same.
I think that those who spend a lot of their free time developing sims, deserve a small reward at least.

Your life can have a thousand different meanings or maybe just one....I'd recommend more than one in case you got it wrong - (Rezende)
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Hong Kong East - Released 01/06/2019 at 18:27 #118620
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There seems to be a lot of interest in this sim shown in the 'Introductions' posts alone.

I have noted that there are 5 different eras.
Looking forward to the 4 yet to come!

Your life can have a thousand different meanings or maybe just one....I'd recommend more than one in case you got it wrong - (Rezende)
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Hong Kong East - Released 01/06/2019 at 19:58 #118627
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headshot119 in post 118585 said:

Dedication
In memory of Max Anderson, who annoyed us a lot but made us think, and who I promised this sim would be free.
Thanks for including this - I have to admit it brought a slight tear to my eye, to remember that he's no longer with us.

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Hong Kong East - Released 01/06/2019 at 22:28 #118642
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Absolutely fantastic! I will be making a donation shortly! Well done, Clive (and Karl? Or are you just the bearer of good news here? :)), and thanks a bunch for making this one free!

Rest in peace, maxand.

Last edited: 01/06/2019 at 22:49 by Muzer
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Hong Kong East - Released 01/06/2019 at 23:20 #118644
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bugsy in post 118620 said:

I have noted that there are 5 different eras.
Looking forward to the 4 yet to come!
Don't get too excited: they're basically the default era with bits removed. The most recent era has a slight layout change at Hung Hom as well.

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Hong Kong East - Released 01/06/2019 at 23:24 #118645
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Forest Pines in post 118627 said:
headshot119 in post 118585 said:

Dedication
In memory of Max Anderson, who annoyed us a lot but made us think, and who I promised this sim would be free.
Thanks for including this - I have to admit it brought a slight tear to my eye, to remember that he's no longer with us.
Indeed. I have recently been reading through some old forum posts and found several from him where he's made suggestions that I'm keeping a note of and could well appear in the core code one day.

He was one of those opposed to charging for sims when the idea was first introduced. I said then that not all sims in the future would be charged for and made the promise then (not naming the sim, of course). Which may give an idea how long it's taken me to finish HKE (too many family and core code distractions).

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Hong Kong East - Released 02/06/2019 at 06:15 #118651
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Hopefully, it will also include the pre-1998 era before the resignalling to show how our railway evolved from the original British system - three and four aspect signals with AWS to the hybrid cab signalling. I am still gathering information about this.

I have also talked to a retired KCR member of staff who originally adopted (and amended) the system with the specialist from British Rail and they amazed me with their creativity on how they amended the system to allow more trains running on the line without delay.
They have amended the Associated position light attached to main aspect signal - which is mainly for coupling in the UK - to make it a call-on shunting signal so that even when the previous train did not leave the overlap, the following train was still allowed to shunt beyond the main signal on 25km/h (15mph) to the platform tailwall. (This is mostly un-British I would believe) This practice eventually became the headway boards in cab-signalling as seen in the simulation.

Last edited: 02/06/2019 at 06:44 by garylaw
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Hong Kong East - Released 02/06/2019 at 06:35 #118652
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Muzer in post 118642 said:
Absolutely fantastic! I will be making a donation shortly! Well done, Clive (and Karl? Or are you just the bearer of good news here? :)), and thanks a bunch for making this one free!

Rest in peace, maxand.
I'm just the bearer of good news.

"CHECK Do you stop at Capenhurst?" - Opinions are my own and not those of my employer
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Hong Kong East - Released 02/06/2019 at 07:16 #118656
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OMG Thanks for releasing a sim in my hometown
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Hong Kong East - Released 26/06/2019 at 08:19 #119119
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This is really amazing! I left my Simsig for a while and when I randomly thought of checking it out again here it is!
I use this line (officially called East Rail Line, or EAL by internal designation) to and from work everyday, at what used to be KCRC's Headquarters (now one of MTR's office buildings).
I will be sure to try it out and help improve it.

Some suggestions I noticed from the wiki description:
- Mong Kok station has been renamed Mong Kok East since the MTR-KCR merger in 2007. This is because the ex-MTR network also has a station named Mong Kok, that is about 500m to the southwest.
- I did some research on the Operations Manual and did not find any reference to Beacon Hill Tunnel restricted to 5 trains. Either it is an obsolete arrangement, or I am missing something.
- The 132s spacing you mentioned is applied throughout the line: this is per traction current rating
- Only one train is allowed between the main signals in either portals of Chau Tau Tunnel - this is a tunnel ventilation restriction
- not all Intercity trains make technical stops at Lo Wu. Trains operated by Chinese Railways make the stop to allow MTR Pilot Man to board the train, per Safety Rules requirements; some of the trains (known as Ktt) are operated by MTR driver, who can operate the entire route from Hong Kong to Guanzhou on his/her own, there Ktt trains do not stop and simply passes Lo Wu
- In the post 2009 layout, cross line movements to and from Platform 3 at Hung Hom require authorisation from Traffic Controller, cut-off point is Signal 1107.
East Rail Line (EAL) to West Rail Line (WRL) movements is done by: (1) EAL controller request control of signal P3SB from WRL controller before train arrives at Hung Hom; (2) EAL train enters Platform 3 and stop short of P3SB; (3) train driver obtain authorisation from WRL controller; (4) proceed when authorisation is granted
WRL to EAL movement is done by: (1) WRL train hold at the northern stop board (which is short of 1107); (2) WRL train obtain authorisation from EAL traffic controller; (3) proceed when authorisation is granted
In real life thought, this movement would only be used either by a loco hauled EMU (SP1900 EMU undergoing overhaul at the WRL depot, or in more recent years, trial run of the MLR EMU for dismantling at the same depot) or trains running on Restricted Manual Mode. This is because the signalling systems in EAL and WRL are incompatible.

Last edited: 27/06/2019 at 08:15 by Edmund1635
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Hong Kong East - Released 03/07/2019 at 10:06 #119244
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Edmund1635 in post 119119 said:

This is really amazing! I left my Simsig for a while and when I randomly thought of checking it out again here it is!
You're welcome. It's been a long time in the making (I started in 2012 but have been distracted now and again) but an interesting experience. I'll be more careful next time someone says "UK signalling with a few minor variations"!

Edmund1635 in post 119119 said:

I use this line (officially called East Rail Line, or EAL by internal designation) to and from work everyday, at what used to be KCRC's Headquarters (now one of MTR's office buildings).
I know the name "Hong Kong East" isn't really right. I don't recall why I picked it to begin with but, by the time I realized there was a problem with it, there was too much that would have to be changed.

Edmund1635 in post 119119 said:

I will be sure to try it out and help improve it.
Please do. Observations of real operations are always useful. You could also try writing your own timetable, perhaps based on a day when unusual things were happening (e.g. a partial closure with only the outstabled trains available on one half). I'm sure others will have suggestions.

Edmund1635 in post 119119 said:

- Mong Kok station has been renamed Mong Kok East since the MTR-KCR merger in 2007. This is because the ex-MTR network also has a station named Mong Kok, that is about 500m to the southwest.
All the documentation I have uses the name "Mong Kok". I'll stick something in the manual.

Edmund1635 in post 119119 said:

- I did some research on the Operations Manual and did not find any reference to Beacon Hill Tunnel restricted to 5 trains. Either it is an obsolete arrangement, or I am missing something.
I suspect it may be obsolete; I assumed it was a ventilation issue. I'll see if I can track down the source and confirm it or otherwise. (The logic to do it was, um, not entirely simple and I don't want to rip it out now it's working.)

Edmund1635 in post 119119 said:

- The 132s spacing you mentioned is applied throughout the line: this is per traction current rating
Exactly how is it applied? It can't simply be trains passing a given signal or there'd be no need for headway boards.

Edmund1635 in post 119119 said:

- Only one train is allowed between the main signals in either portals of Chau Tau Tunnel - this is a tunnel ventilation restriction
Raised as Mantis 25792. However, before I can fix it, is this enforced by the signalling (I can't see it in the control tables), by ARS, or is it just an instruction to the signallers and they are supposed to watch out to make sure it doesn't happen?

Edmund1635 in post 119119 said:

- not all Intercity trains make technical stops at Lo Wu. Trains operated by Chinese Railways make the stop to allow MTR Pilot Man to board the train, per Safety Rules requirements; some of the trains (known as Ktt) are operated by MTR driver, who can operate the entire route from Hong Kong to Guanzhou on his/her own, there Ktt trains do not stop and simply passes Lo Wu
I thought I'd got that right in the timetable (I can't check right now).

Edmund1635 in post 119119 said:

- In the post 2009 layout, cross line movements to and from Platform 3 at Hung Hom require authorisation from Traffic Controller, cut-off point is Signal 1107.
East Rail Line (EAL) to West Rail Line (WRL) movements is done by: (1) EAL controller request control of signal P3SB from WRL controller before train arrives at Hung Hom; (2) EAL train enters Platform 3 and stop short of P3SB; (3) train driver obtain authorisation from WRL controller; (4) proceed when authorisation is granted
WRL to EAL movement is done by: (1) WRL train hold at the northern stop board (which is short of 1107); (2) WRL train obtain authorisation from EAL traffic controller; (3) proceed when authorisation is granted
In real life thought, this movement would only be used either by a loco hauled EMU (SP1900 EMU undergoing overhaul at the WRL depot, or in more recent years, trial run of the MLR EMU for dismantling at the same depot) or trains running on Restricted Manual Mode. This is because the signalling systems in EAL and WRL are incompatible.
Raised as Mantis 25794 but unlikely to be done very soon.

Thanks very much for these comments.

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Hong Kong East - Released 03/07/2019 at 22:58 #119251
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clive in post 119244 said:
Edmund1635 in post 119119 said:

- not all Intercity trains make technical stops at Lo Wu. Trains operated by Chinese Railways make the stop to allow MTR Pilot Man to board the train, per Safety Rules requirements; some of the trains (known as Ktt) are operated by MTR driver, who can operate the entire route from Hong Kong to Guanzhou on his/her own, there Ktt trains do not stop and simply passes Lo Wu
I thought I'd got that right in the timetable (I can't check right now).
I did. Look at P708, which is a Ktt train.

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Hong Kong East - Released 11/07/2019 at 05:19 #119369
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Edmund1635 in post 119119 said:

I will be sure to try it out and help improve it.
Please do. Observations of real operations are always useful. You could also try writing your own timetable, perhaps based on a day when unusual things were happening (e.g. a partial closure with only the outstabled trains available on one half). I'm sure others will have suggestions.

I would love to give it a go - although I will need to learn how to actually write a timetable for Simsig use. There are actually many preset WTT for different scenarios - the more interesting ones would be Racecourse services (the station is only open when there are horse races - with this TT some trains will be diverted onto the Racecourse branch and omit Fo Tan). The TTs also carry outstabling arrangements so these can be factored in as well.
I can also access Traffic Notices - which mean I will be able to include Engineer's Train and Test Train as well.


Edmund1635 in post 119119 said:

- Mong Kok station has been renamed Mong Kok East since the MTR-KCR merger in 2007. This is because the ex-MTR network also has a station named Mong Kok, that is about 500m to the southwest.
All the documentation I have uses the name "Mong Kok". I'll stick something in the manual.

Edmund1635 in post 119119 said:

- I did some research on the Operations Manual and did not find any reference to Beacon Hill Tunnel restricted to 5 trains. Either it is an obsolete arrangement, or I am missing something.
I suspect it may be obsolete; I assumed it was a ventilation issue. I'll see if I can track down the source and confirm it or otherwise. (The logic to do it was, um, not entirely simple and I don't want to rip it out now it's working.)

From the track diagrams, the Beacon Hill Tunnel portal is about 2500m long. This will take an EMU around 100s to pass. Bearing in mind there is a minimum headway of 132s on the line, its practically impossible to have more than one train each way inside the tunnel anyways. So on second thoughts, the restriction might actually be there, only there are other limiting factors which nullifies the effect on this one.
In real life - I have never seen more than one train meeting inside the tunnel, either way I go.

Edmund1635 in post 119119 said:

- The 132s spacing you mentioned is applied throughout the line: this is per traction current rating
Exactly how is it applied? It can't simply be trains passing a given signal or there'd be no need for headway boards.
I wasn't clear about that statement - the exact statement per manual is "minimum headway 2.2-2.4 minutes".
Again, at present this is limited by fleet capacity - the current timetable sees a minimum headway of 2.5 minutes with 33 our of 34 trains put into services.

Edmund1635 in post 119119 said:

- Only one train is allowed between the main signals in either portals of Chau Tau Tunnel - this is a tunnel ventilation restriction
Raised as Mantis 25792. However, before I can fix it, is this enforced by the signalling (I can't see it in the control tables), by ARS, or is it just an instruction to the signallers and they are supposed to watch out to make sure it doesn't happen?

I don't know for sure how it is enforced, but best guess would be ARS plus instruction to signallers. It is documented in the Operations Control Manual so signallers must have responsibility to it to some extent.

Edmund1635 in post 119119 said:

- not all Intercity trains make technical stops at Lo Wu. Trains operated by Chinese Railways make the stop to allow MTR Pilot Man to board the train, per Safety Rules requirements; some of the trains (known as Ktt) are operated by MTR driver, who can operate the entire route from Hong Kong to Guanzhou on his/her own, there Ktt trains do not stop and simply passes Lo Wu
I thought I'd got that right in the timetable (I can't check right now).

Edmund1635 in post 119119 said:

- In the post 2009 layout, cross line movements to and from Platform 3 at Hung Hom require authorisation from Traffic Controller, cut-off point is Signal 1107.
East Rail Line (EAL) to West Rail Line (WRL) movements is done by: (1) EAL controller request control of signal P3SB from WRL controller before train arrives at Hung Hom; (2) EAL train enters Platform 3 and stop short of P3SB; (3) train driver obtain authorisation from WRL controller; (4) proceed when authorisation is granted
WRL to EAL movement is done by: (1) WRL train hold at the northern stop board (which is short of 1107); (2) WRL train obtain authorisation from EAL traffic controller; (3) proceed when authorisation is granted
In real life thought, this movement would only be used either by a loco hauled EMU (SP1900 EMU undergoing overhaul at the WRL depot, or in more recent years, trial run of the MLR EMU for dismantling at the same depot) or trains running on Restricted Manual Mode. This is because the signalling systems in EAL and WRL are incompatible.
Raised as Mantis 25794 but unlikely to be done very soon.
I don't think it's an urgent item TBH, but would certainly be a nice to have for accuracy sake. As I mentioned, this arrangement find few uses outside traffic hours to begin with, I can't think of any scenario it will find a use during the day

Thanks very much for these comments.[/quote]

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Hong Kong East - Released 11/07/2019 at 09:39 #119372
Jan
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Side note - some of the quotes in your posts have become a bit mixed up - it's a bit hard to tell apart which bits are quotes of Clive's post and which are your own replies.

Edmund1635 in post 119369 said:
clive in post 119244 said:
Edmund1635 in post 119119 said:

- The 132s spacing you mentioned is applied throughout the line: this is per traction current rating

Exactly how is it applied? It can't simply be trains passing a given signal or there'd be no need for headway boards.

I wasn't clear about that statement - the exact statement per manual is "minimum headway 2.2-2.4 minutes".

Does that mean that the whole thing is actually just a planning restriction for timetabling, i.e. you're not allowed to timetable trains closer together than 132 seconds, but during actual operation trains are allowed to run closer together in case of delays, or is this enforced as an actual operating restriction? Because as Clive said, in the latter case this would seem to negate the capacity gains of the headway boards to a large extent and make service recovery after delays more difficult.

Edmund1635 in post 119369 said:
Again, at present this is limited by fleet capacity - the current timetable sees a minimum headway of 2.5 minutes with 33 our of 34 trains put into services.

If the "minimum headway 2.2-2.4 minutes" was a hard operating limit (as opposed to merely a planning limit), I don't think it would be wise to timetable larger numbers of successive trains right up to the limit anyway, because in that case each small delay of even a few seconds would immediately be transmitted to all trains behind it without any scope for recovery.

Two million people attempt to use Birmingham's magnificent rail network every year, with just over a million of them managing to get further than Smethwick.
Last edited: 11/07/2019 at 09:40 by Jan
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Hong Kong East - Released 12/07/2019 at 09:55 #119391
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Jan in post 119372 said:
<snip>
If the "minimum headway 2.2-2.4 minutes" was a hard operating limit (as opposed to merely a planning limit), I don't think it would be wise to timetable larger numbers of successive trains right up to the limit anyway, because in that case each small delay of even a few seconds would immediately be transmitted to all trains behind it without any scope for recovery.
Modern Railways a month or two back had an article on Traffic Management systems, including a contribution from a London Underground bod. He made the point that, on a metro system (and in contrast to a main line system), if you have signalling that gives a 30 trains per hour capacity, that's what you run in the peak. It was in the context of what TM systemts can offer and his point was that, on a metro system like LU (and therefore presumably HKE), "...when the **** hits the fan it hits it hard and fast". So yes, I suspect the peak probably does see trains booked at 132sec headways.

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Hong Kong East - Released 12/07/2019 at 10:16 #119392
MarkC
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Another thing that could affect headway times is infrastructure restrictions that would limit the number of trains, take Beacon Hill Tunnel for example, trains must be 132 seconds apart (running in the same direction)
It's not my fault! I was left unsupervised.
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Hong Kong East - Released 31/07/2019 at 15:58 #119766
mm2mm2
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Suggestion:
Don't know if this involves a lot of work but it will probably be fun if HKE can adopt the delay feature:
"a train which may develop a defect in-service and you will need to decide how to deal with it"
from the LUL Victoria Line simulation.

From the manual of LUL Victoria Line:
Quote:

Scenarios:

Severe delays: As for minor delays but more so. Various other problems maybe encountered including a train which may develop a defect in-service and you will need to decide how to deal with it. Note, that the defect is noted against the Vnnn number so a replacement train running to the same number will continue to report the defect unless the original train is returned to Northumberland Park depot first. If you decide to return the stock to Northumberland Park depot it must be running to a timetable that has the same first four characters as it was running within the Sim.
As the Sim has bespoke train delays written into it I recommend that the f3 train delay settings are maintained at zero.

Last edited: 31/07/2019 at 15:59 by mm2mm2
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