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You are here: Home > Forum > Miscellaneous > The real thing (signalling) > OOGs

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OOGs 17/07/2019 at 23:07 #119471
TUT
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We all know that trains with an X in their headcodes are out-of-gauge (OOG) and cannot be routed by ARS.

But what exactly defines an OOG train? One that's "too wide" is the obvious answer. But there must be others? Height, I guess. But what about weight and length? Is there any clear definition of "out-of-gauge"?

I've also been thinking about the sort of things you need to take into account.

Obviously OOG trains are a risk to other trains, and presumably tunnels, but what else? Platforms? How about people working on or near the line?

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OOGs 17/07/2019 at 23:52 #119472
headshot119
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In a nutshell any train that is outside the "Normal" loading gauge for a line on it's route of travel. A particular train might be out of gauge between Box A, and Box B, but it isn't between Box B and Box Y, but is between Box Y and Box Z.

- Height
- Length (More so specific vehicle lengths than entire train length)
- Width

are all factors and probably other things as well.

And are risks to basically anything that it might hit. Though I've never known any restrictions about people on or near the line, that's not to say it doesn't happen mind.

A notice is issued for each train which basically tells the signallers and train crew what the restrictions are (Speed, banned platforms, route it must take etc)


Some random examples...

A Class 221, or 390 which suffers from a hard over tilt activation is considered out of gauge on the side which it's leaning over to.

Passenger trains formed of stock with drop light windows are considered out of gauge between Carlisle and Maryport on the Cumbrian Coast Line unless fitted with window bars, OR a special notice has been issued which ensures a PIC is appointed on the train who ensures all the windows are closed and remained closed throughout. This is due to extreme limited clearances between the train and certain items of infrastructure, Aspatria Tunnel being one.

"CHECK Do you stop at Capenhurst?" - Opinions are my own and not those of my employer
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OOGs 18/07/2019 at 07:49 #119473
Ron_J
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Any train running with an X headcode should have a Conditions of Travel notice which sets out exactly which route(s) must be used and what prohibitions are in place, as well as restrictions on passing traffic. The signalbox should have a copy of the CoT form. There’s usually an RT3973 fotm of one sort or another involved too.
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OOGs 18/07/2019 at 09:22 #119475
kbarber
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Ron_J in post 119473 said:
Any train running with an X headcode should have a Conditions of Travel notice which sets out exactly which route(s) must be used and what prohibitions are in place, as well as restrictions on passing traffic. The signalbox should have a copy of the CoT form. There’s usually an RT3973 fotm of one sort or another involved too.
I was under the impression an X headcode referred to any train with conditions of passage, normally advised by a BR29973 (in my day). It might only include such things as additional speed restrictions (not an uncommon one for freights we turned out of the Brent in the early '80s), though there could be routing restrictions and suchlike as well. Many of the restrictions were headed with the appropriate telegraph codes - FABRIC ("Not to exceed a speed of... between... and..."was the favourite, usually because of heavy axle loads (but occasionally, I think, because the dynamic envelope was rather close to the loading guage).

In those days signalboxes were unlikely to have details of the form carried by the train... no internet in those days, no way (other than the X in the headcode) of advising which trains were EXLO and which weren't, as it would vary from day to day according to the traffic being carried.

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OOGs 18/07/2019 at 13:55 #119481
Ron_J
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It's managed under the Conditions of Travel notice process now. The code words live on but only on the paperwork sent out by the Freight Capacity Planning team in Milton Keynes. A large number of freight trains run under RT3973 HAW/CON/EXL/NUC forms (formerly the BR29973 you mention) but don't run under an X headcode or CoT notice and the signaller doesn't really need to know about them other than where specific restrictions apply.
Last edited: 18/07/2019 at 13:59 by Ron_J
Reason: None given

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OOGs 18/07/2019 at 16:00 #119484
clive
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kbarber in post 119475 said:

I was under the impression an X headcode referred to any train with conditions of passage, normally advised by a BR29973 (in my day). It might only include such things as additional speed restrictions (not an uncommon one for freights we turned out of the Brent in the early '80s), though there could be routing restrictions and suchlike as well. Many of the restrictions were headed with the appropriate telegraph codes - FABRIC ("Not to exceed a speed of... between... and..."was the favourite, usually because of heavy axle loads (but occasionally, I think, because the dynamic envelope was rather close to the loading guage).
The 373s (NoL Eurostars) ran with X headcodes. They were limited to (the old) platform 2 (and possibly 3) at Peterborough but also had speed limits on the Down Fast just north of Hitchin and of Peterborough because of dynamic envelope - in each case there was a bit of underbridge sticking up that they could sideswipe at full speed (there were "TGV" signs at the bridges to remind the drivers but, as far as I know, nothing at braking distance).

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OOGs 18/07/2019 at 17:07 #119486
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clive in post 119484 said:
The 373s (NoL Eurostars) ran with X headcodes. They were limited to (the old) platform 2 (and possibly 3) at Peterborough but also had speed limits on the Down Fast just north of Hitchin and of Peterborough because of dynamic envelope - in each case there was a bit of underbridge sticking up that they could sideswipe at full speed (there were "TGV" signs at the bridges to remind the drivers but, as far as I know, nothing at braking distance).
More about the restrictions on the Cl. 373s running as 1Xnn when working to/from Kings Cross in the topic here.

"Always forgive your enemies -- nothing annoys them so much" - Oscar Wilde (16/10/1854 – 30/11/1900), Irish poet and playwright.
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OOGs 18/07/2019 at 18:30 #119487
Ron_J
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There’s also an increasing tendency these days to run things which have specific route restrictions but aren’t ‘out of gauge’ as such with a Q headcode under an NRAP certificate rather than a CoT notice. The line between the meanings of Q and X has become very blurred recently and the whole thing is a minefield for Signallers and, to a greater extent, Train Running Controllers.
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