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Table of Contents

Southampton
Sim Versions
Timetables
Introduction
Area Overview
Southampton Central
St. Denys
Millbrook
Ashurst (New Forest)
Other Stations
Down Loop
Up Goods Loop
The Yards, Docks, and Sidings
Signalling
Signalling Types
Route Types
Special Features
Signal Numbers
Timetabling
Headcodes
Regulation Strategies
And finally...
Signalling Diagrams

Southampton

Sim Versions

Version Status Scroll/Views Published Comments Pass code
V2.201.0.0 Donationware S 12/11/09 Available from Download section
V24 Donationware V 23/06/01 No longer available for download 9A574

Timetables

Title Published Author Comments
Summer 1993 23/06/01 TBC Bundled with V24
Summer 1993 New 11/11/09 TBC Bundled with V2.201.0.0
Southampton 3 Hour Chaos TBC Mvr_signalling Available from Download section
Southampton 30 March 05 TBC Driver_curran Available from Download section
Southampton 85 TBC KurtDS Available from Download section
Southampton Spring 2003 TBC Muzthing Available from Download section
Southampton Spring 2003 for V2 201 08/06/13 Muzthing/Sloppyjag Submission awaiting acceptance - Watch this Space
Southampton SX09 1.2 29/11/09 jdtech Available from Download section

Introduction

Welcome to Southampton! This simulation covers a large part of the Southampton area, which is controlled by Eastleigh PSB (prefix E). As well as the constant stream of passenger workings, both EMUs and DMUs, you will also have to contend with a large number of freight workings to, from, and through the large terminals in the area.

As already mentioned, Southampton is controlled by Eastleigh PSB, which also controls Eastleigh itself, Fareham, Totton, and Romsey. It is large entrance-exit (NX) panel built a few decades ago, although some equipment has been updated since.

The orientation of the panel is such that east is on the left and west is on the right - in other words, you are facing south. Put another way, London is off to the left and Bournemouth/Weymouth are off to the right.


:usertrack:mans:sotonmap.png

Area Overview

Southampton Central

Four through platforms with a combination of both through and terminating trains make this a busy location.

Through trains tend to use the outer platforms (1 and 4), whereas terminating trains tend to use the centre platforms (2 and 3). The platforms are divided into 'A' and 'B' ends for timetabling purposes. This way, two trains can be scheduled to use the platform at the same time - and they do, regularly!

The trains themselves will stop at the end of the platform most appropriate to their next move - the near end (in terms of approaching the platform) if the next move is back out the same way (reversal), or the far end if the next move is to continue in the same direction (through train). Be careful to remember this if sending a second train into the platform. Note that the Eastleigh signallers cannot see where the train has stopped either!

St. Denys

This station forms the junction between the Eastleigh and Fareham lines. The track layout is not ideal for non-conflicting moves and the section over Adelaide Road Level Crossing is on a tight bend, making moves over it quite slow in comparison to the Eastleigh line.

Note also that the Fareham branch has long signal sections, so routesetting is not necessary until after an approaching train has passed its last green signal. By contrast, the Eastleigh line has four aspect signalling with short sections, making the approach to St. Denys quite quick.

Millbrook

This island platform is only served by trains on the slow lines between Redbridge and Southampton Central. Be careful to ensure you route trains stopping at Millbrook onto the slow lines. Such trains are usually the all-station stoppers.

Ashurst (New Forest)

This station was, until recently, called Lyndhurst Road. It is used by local trains, usually all-station stopping trains.

Other Stations

The remaining stations are used by local trains, usually all-station stopping trains.

Down Loop

This loop, just to the west of Southampton Central, is available for passenger and freight use. Note that the Down Fast line, running parallel, can also be used, but not any other line.

Up Goods Loop

This loop, on the opposite side of the line to the Down Loop, is available for freight use only. The adjacent Up Fast may also be used, but not any other line.

The Yards, Docks, and Sidings

Nearly all the yards, dock areas, etc. will only accept a train when the shunter in charge (not you, the signaller!) has pressed the Shunter's Release plunger (indicated by the letters SR with a roundel (button) on the screen). This will happen when (1) the route is set into the yard (grey arrowhead); (2) the train description is correct for that train; (3) the train is approaching the yard; (4) that train is destined to go into that yard.

To send a train into one of the yards, route the train into the exit (grey arrowhead) as early as possible (to allow the shunter to reach the yard entry point, set the points, press the SR plunger, etc. without delaying the driver). As the train approaches, you will see the shunter's plunger, normally hollow, become solid for a few seconds, indicating that the points are set correctly within the yard, so the train can enter. As the train begins to enter the yard, the plunger reverts to hollow.

Note that these are not slots - clicking them has no effect.

Trains coming out of the yard will have their train description interposed into the departure berth. The train will be ready a minute or two later. Set the route out of the yard manually as normal.

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Electrification

Most of the lines are electrified on the DC third rail system. Those that aren't are indicated on-screen. You shouldn't have a problem unless you try routing a passenger train onto a goods line, which is generally not advised anyway!

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Signalling

Signalling Types

There is a range of two-, three-, and four-aspect signalling, along with repeaters, and ground shunt signals.

Route Types

Controlled Signals and Warner Routes

There are a couple of main routes where an alternative warner route is available. This is indicated by a yellow exit triangle at the exit signal. By clicking on this exit triangle instead of the main signal, you get a reduced overlap. This allows movements by other trains not normally possible with a full overlap, but restricts the speed of the first train. If a forward route is set (beyond the exit of the warner route), the warner route will automatically step up to a main route but only if the conditions are right for it to do so.

Intermediate Routing Buttons

At the east end of Southampton Central, there are two blue arrows. These are buttons for selecting a non-preferred (or alternative) route. Click on the entrance signal as normal, then click on the blue arrow, then click on the exit signal. You do not need to use these buttons - if the preferred route is not available, then it will set the non-preferred anyway.

Call-on Routes

Call-on routes are allowed into the platforms at Southampton and at a couple of other locations. This is selected by the interlocking at routesetting time when the platform (or last track(s) in the route) track is occupied. Therefore, if a train is on its way to the platform, but hasn't yet entered it, do not overset a call-on route until the train is actually in the platform.

Note that the entrance signal to the route will only clear to a calling-on aspect when the following conditions are true:

  • That the platform track is occupied;
  • The departure signal is "ON" (

    Huddersfield Control );

  • That the train to be called-on has been timed to, or nearly to, a stand at the entrance signal;
  • That the measuring track circuit(s) (where used) is/are occupied and the track circuit(s) in rear are clear. This gives you some protection against sending a too-long train into an occupied platform but is not foolproof. It is up to you to make sure that you don't put trains into platforms that would foul the station throat. Look at the Trains List to see how long each train is.

Special Features

Point locking is effective on certain points which are located immediately beyond a signal. This means that the points cannot be moved until after a timeout after the berth track circuit to the signal has been occupied. The overlap has been timed to release at this time also, so when the overlap releases, so does the point locking and you will be able to (subject to other conditions, of course) move the points again. This protection is to avoid the possibility of an overrunning train rolling into the points which are being moved from normal to reverse or vice versa, thus derailing the train and damaging the pointwork.

There are a couple of alternative (non-preferred) routes. The interlocking will automatically select the alternative where the preferred route is unavailable.

Signal Numbers

The following is a schematic map of the area showing the signal numbers and freight-only lines. Signals are not necessarily shown on the correct side of the track; this is just for a rough guide to the signal numbering.

Timetabling

Headcodes

The first character (digit) indicates the classification of the train:

0 - Light loco(s)

1 - Express passenger train, postal, or mail train

2 - Ordinary passenger train

3 - Parcels train and 90mph freight (rarely used)

4 - 75mph freight, including Freightliners

5 - Empty coaching stock train

6 - 60mph freight

7 - 45mph freight

8 - 35mph freight or lower

9 - International

The second character (letter) indicates the routing or destination area:

B - Waterloo and Southampton Docks, Lymington Pier, or Poole

C - Victoria / London Bridge and Portsmouth / Southampton via Crawley

D - Salisbury and Eastleigh via Redbridge

E - Trains to Eastern Zone

F - Portsmouth and Cardiff

H - Victoria / London Bridge and Portsmouth / Southampton via Hove (class 2 not available)

K - Portsmouth and Southampton / Wareham via Netley

L - Trains to Anglia Zone

M - Trains to Midlands Zone

O - Trains to Southern Zone

S - Trains to Scottish Zone

V - Trains to Western Zone

W - Waterloo and Weymouth

X - Royal trains and trains conveying out-of-gauge or other exceptional loads

Z - Excursion, military, and other special trains

Note that older/newer timetables may be slightly different.

The third and fourth characters (digits) indicate the individual train reporting number.

Regulation Strategies

Here are some tips to help you regulate trains through your area.

Watch the trains as they approach on the fringes. You will get to learn how close they are to signals, which is vital for regulating some of the junctions because of the long signal sections.

Before letting a freight train out of a yard, make sure there is a path for it. Some may try to leave early. You do have the advantage of lots of loops though.

Note also:

  • At the time of writing this section (February 2012), the current version is v3.2.3, though the installer file downloaded has the version number 2.201. Installing it will display the updated version number.
  • The Fawley refinery is offscreen, at the end of the Marchwood siding.
  • The Totton Yard contains a Totton Loop, which may be a timing point on its own.
  • Southampton is a small, fairly straightforward sim which should appeal to a beginner wanting to move up to one with an intermediate level of difficulty.
  • Its level crossings are fully automated so do not place too great a strain on the player, but unlike later sims does not penalize you for unnecessarily holding up road traffic if you leave the barriers down too long! (e.g. Exeter). So you should train yourself to set routes through them only when necessary.
  • Although replacing a signal in front of a driver will earn you an ACOA, there is no extra time penalty in terms of the driver needing to talk with his Control, as you will find in later sims. But an ACOA is still an ACOA!
  • Although this sim is wide enough to maintain plenty of interest, the vertical height of its panel is moderate, thus allowing it to be well managed on a single screen. Check

    this page for one arrangement of extra view windows.

  • As this is an early sim which has not been updated for a while, it does not include a Simplifier. However, one is not really required. Additionally, bugs and difficulties have by now been reported and documented, so you should check out the relevant Forum category and read the posts.
  • Track circuit, points and signal failures never occur.
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    And finally...

    Have fun! Experiment! Create your own timetables and spread them around to friends! Edit the supplied timetables freely, I place no restrictions on adapting them and spreading them around, except that they are to be used with SimSig only. If you create a great timetable, why not send it to me so I can upload it onto the SimSig website and allow others to download it?

(C) 2001 G. Mayo

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Signalling Diagrams

Southampton Signal Number Plan

This is an Adobe Acrobat PDF file. If you don't have Adobe Acrobat Reader installed on your computer you can get a free download of the latest version from the Adobe website . Use the built-in Find function (Ctrl+F) to locate signal numbers.

Simulation Manuals

Last edited by Steamer on 29/04/2017 at 18:53