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Cheshire Lines Timetables 11/07/2020 at 20:27 #129481
jc92
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Peter Bennet in post 129480 said:
Humorist in post 129436 said:
Peter Bennet in post 129414 said:
What's a UTU?

Peter (a schoolboy)
Peter - thanks for asking. That's the trouble with TLAs, no-one has the balls to ask.
I do have a bit of a habit at work for stopping people in mid-flow to ask them what they are talking about!

Peter
Normally followed by everyone else in the meeting silently thinking "thank god someone asked, I didn't have a clue either"

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Cheshire Lines Timetables 12/07/2020 at 09:28 #129495
kbarber
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Phil-jmw in post 129462 said:


<snip>

UTU's appear in many of the Simsig TT's, bugsy, and have been discussed in various threads in this forum so it was fair of me to assume many of you would know what one is (unless people run sims without knowing what some of the trains are),
<snip>
A collection of traction and (sometimes) vehicles that passes through sections complete with tail lamp in obedience to the signals. Isn't it? Apart from class (for regulating) and destination/route (at junctions), what more does a bobby need to know?

Last edited: 12/07/2020 at 09:29 by kbarber
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Cheshire Lines Timetables 12/07/2020 at 09:51 #129496
DriverCurran
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So how do you comply with table 'D' of the sectional appendix as a signaller if you don't what what the various component vehicles are of each train that you require to comply with your signals.

Paul

You have to get a red before you can get any other colour
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Cheshire Lines Timetables 13/07/2020 at 09:07 #129535
kbarber
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DriverCurran in post 129496 said:
So how do you comply with table 'D' of the sectional appendix as a signaller if you don't what what the various component vehicles are of each train that you require to comply with your signals.

Paul
You'll have to enlighten me Paul. The newest SA here in dinosaur world is 1980, tables D2 and D3 have to do with single line tokens (delivery & receipt by other than signalmen and auxiliary instruments where token withdrawn by trainmen).

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Cheshire Lines Timetables 13/07/2020 at 11:09 #129541
Phil-jmw
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kbarber in post 129495 said:
Phil-jmw in post 129462 said:


<snip>

UTU's appear in many of the Simsig TT's, bugsy, and have been discussed in various threads in this forum so it was fair of me to assume many of you would know what one is (unless people run sims without knowing what some of the trains are),
<snip>
A collection of traction and (sometimes) vehicles that passes through sections complete with tail lamp in obedience to the signals. Isn't it? Apart from class (for regulating) and destination/route (at junctions), what more does a bobby need to know?
With regard to regulating speed is crucial, especially where the same train classification involves different speeds, eg UTU's. They all run Class 3 but transit at up to 75mph, while recording max speed is 30mph. Misread the notices and get them mixed up (as occasionally happens) and an orderly queue can soon form behind one that is recording.

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Cheshire Lines Timetables 13/07/2020 at 11:23 #129542
DriverCurran
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Keith

Table D these days lists if a particular type of vehicle is authorised to run over a piece of track or if there are any restrictions in place. On Oxted I have used those tables to apply a speed of 10 mph (I think) over Oxted viaduct for any train that has a locomotive in its formation. While that is a fairly wide application, there could be a table D instruction for wagons that say a HEA can run at the maximum speed for the train, whereas a HEB can only do 15 mph and an OPPOS restriction is in force for the Reversible if the train is on the Up Main. Yes I know these wagon types may or may not exist.

For those not in the know :-

OPPOS - Opposite line to be blocked to traffic.

Paul

You have to get a red before you can get any other colour
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Cheshire Lines Timetables 13/07/2020 at 14:18 #129545
clive
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DriverCurran in post 129542 said:

OPPOS - Opposite line to be blocked to traffic.
Running lines and/or sidings mentioned on the right-hand side of the load looking in the direction of travel must be clear, and no train signalled 2-6-2 or 2-6-3 must be allowed on the running lines and/or sidings on the left-hand side of the load. To be signalled by the special 'Is line clear?' signal 2-6-3.

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Cheshire Lines Timetables 14/07/2020 at 09:10 #129564
kbarber
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DriverCurran in post 129542 said:
Keith

Table D these days lists if a particular type of vehicle is authorised to run over a piece of track or if there are any restrictions in place. On Oxted I have used those tables to apply a speed of 10 mph (I think) over Oxted viaduct for any train that has a locomotive in its formation. While that is a fairly wide application, there could be a table D instruction for wagons that say a HEA can run at the maximum speed for the train, whereas a HEB can only do 15 mph and an OPPOS restriction is in force for the Reversible if the train is on the Up Main. Yes I know these wagon types may or may not exist.

For those not in the know :-

OPPOS - Opposite line to be blocked to traffic.

Paul
DERWENT

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Cheshire Lines Timetables 19/07/2020 at 21:59 #129793
whatlep
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A 1977 timetable is now with the Mods for approval. It features a large amount of freight traffic that needs careful regulating. On the passenger side, there is the Altrincham-Manchester EMU service of happier days at intervals as close as 5 minutes, with 3 Chester DMUs per hour also finding a path to Oxford Road in as little as 13 minutes, non-stop.

I hope users enjoy it.

Huge thank you to phil-jmw for helping test the new timetable. Any errors are, of course, down to me.






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Cheshire Lines Timetables 20/07/2020 at 12:49 #129804
Chromatix
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HEA does exist - it's a bogie hopper, air braked. HEB would be the same wagon with dual air/vacuum brake fitment.
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Cheshire Lines Timetables 20/07/2020 at 13:22 #129806
jc92
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Chromatix in post 129804 said:
HEA does exist - it's a bogie hopper, air braked. HEB would be the same wagon with dual air/vacuum brake fitment.
HEAs are 2 axle speedlink coal network hoppers, although latterly theyve also been used for aggregate and scrap

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Cheshire Lines Timetables 20/07/2020 at 14:36 #129807
Chromatix
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Ah, got that confused with HHA and HTA. The point is that the last letter of the triplet identifies the brake type independently of the rest of the wagon, so a difference in loading gauge would not be expected between A and B (or V). An unfitted or through-piped wagon type would have implications for the train class, but this is already encoded into the headcode.
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Cheshire Lines Timetables 22/07/2020 at 07:02 #129867
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Brilliant timetable, enjoying it, all the freight makes it even more of a challenge, road users must have been really frustrated as the barriers were raised for such a short time at Nav Rd and Deansgate during the peak looks worse than Brimsdown and Enfield Lock crossings, crossings I am familiar with in my home town of Enfield are during the rush hours now.

Glyn

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Cheshire Lines Timetables 23/07/2020 at 22:14 #129917
whatlep
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geswedey in post 129867 said:
Brilliant timetable, enjoying it, all the freight makes it even more of a challenge, road users must have been really frustrated as the barriers were raised for such a short time at Nav Rd and Deansgate during the peak looks worse than Brimsdown and Enfield Lock crossings, crossings I am familiar with in my home town of Enfield are during the rush hours now.

Glyn
Thanks so much Glyn. It was, as you suggest, a somewhat tense atmosphere in rush hour around Navigation Road and Deansgate Jn. Reopening Deansgate Jn between trains was a real no-no in 1977 as the crossing gates were real, old-fashioned ones, controlled from a "ship's wheel". Navigation Road was full barriers with push-button control, but a much busier road and without breaks in traffic in the rush hour. Hard to do more than simply hit the down button and hope the traffic stopped clear.

Before 1970, there was also a level crossing on the main A560 at Altrincham station's throat, but that really was just too much for road and rail users to cope with by the late 1960s.

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Cheshire Lines Timetables 23/07/2020 at 23:02 #129919
Phil-jmw
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whatlep in post 129917 said:
geswedey in post 129867 said:
Brilliant timetable, enjoying it, all the freight makes it even more of a challenge, road users must have been really frustrated as the barriers were raised for such a short time at Nav Rd and Deansgate during the peak looks worse than Brimsdown and Enfield Lock crossings, crossings I am familiar with in my home town of Enfield are during the rush hours now.

Glyn
Thanks so much Glyn. It was, as you suggest, a somewhat tense atmosphere in rush hour around Navigation Road and Deansgate Jn. Reopening Deansgate Jn between trains was a real no-no in 1977 as the crossing gates were real, old-fashioned ones, controlled from a "ship's wheel". Navigation Road was full barriers with push-button control, but a much busier road and without breaks in traffic in the rush hour. Hard to do more than simply hit the down button and hope the traffic stopped clear.

Before 1970, there was also a level crossing on the main A560 at Altrincham station's throat, but that really was just too much for road and rail users to cope with by the late 1960s.
I'm just looking at some photos of the old Altrincham North SB on another site Peter (your photos actually), do you know why the corner of the box facing the crossing was cut off at an angle?

Last edited: 23/07/2020 at 23:04 by Phil-jmw
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Cheshire Lines Timetables 24/07/2020 at 01:14 #129924
whatlep
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Phil-jmw in post 129919 said:


I'm just looking at some photos of the old Altrincham North SB on another site Peter (your photos actually), do you know why the corner of the box facing the crossing was cut off at an angle?
It was to provide an unobstructed view of the level crossing complex, which was not simply one road. On either side of the crossing there were T junctions with local roads. Traffic could (and did) queue to get in & out of the local roads. I'm guessing that you've found the picture attached which shows how the box's corner post was cut away and replaced in part with a thin steel rod to support the unchanged roof. How much difference it made I can't say, since the new road bridge (second picture) was built before I was around the area.




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Cheshire Lines Timetables 24/07/2020 at 09:54 #129929
Phil-jmw
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whatlep in post 129924 said:
Phil-jmw in post 129919 said:


I'm just looking at some photos of the old Altrincham North SB on another site Peter (your photos actually), do you know why the corner of the box facing the crossing was cut off at an angle?
It was to provide an unobstructed view of the level crossing complex, which was not simply one road. On either side of the crossing there were T junctions with local roads. Traffic could (and did) queue to get in & out of the local roads. I'm guessing that you've found the picture attached which shows how the box's corner post was cut away and replaced in part with a thin steel rod to support the unchanged roof. How much difference it made I can't say, since the new road bridge (second picture) was built before I was around the area.



Thanks Peter. I knew there had been a crossing there until the early 70's, but I didn't realise it was fed onto by such a complex road layout. Cutting away the corner of the box for a less obstructed view makes sense.

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